Water Trails

Missouri River Breaks in Montana

Lewis and Clark’s legendary expedition would not have been possible had they not been able to navigate some of North America’s longest rivers. On their journey to the Pacific, they relied on the Missouri, the Yellowstone, the Snake, and the Columbia Rivers, the highways of the era. Today, the officially designated water trails of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail are an exciting and iconic way for you to explore the region much as Lewis and Clark themselves would have.

 

Missouri River Water Trail

The 550-mile Missouri River Water Trail offers an opportunity to paddle through history. Using a canoe or kayak, a paddler can choose to solo camp on a sand bar in an apparent wilderness setting or stay in a bed and breakfast in one of the many historic river towns.  Explore >


Missouri National Recreational River Water Trail

The Missouri River National Recreational River Trail carries visitors through some of the last natural stretches of America’s longest river. Paddlers and boaters have the chance to explore more than 147 miles, including wild and scenic stretches of the Missouri River, and view scenery that Lewis and Clark recorded in their journals more than 200 years ago.  Explore >


Missouri River Breaks Water Trail

The Missouri River Breaks Water Trail spans 149 miles of the Upper Missouri River through the Upper Missouri Breaks National Monument, which contains a spectacular array of biological, geological, and historical feature.  Explore >


Jefferson River Canoe Trail

The 80-mile Jefferson River Canoe Trail retraces by water an essential segment of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail along the entire length of the Jefferson River in southwest Montana.  Explore >


Northwest Discovery Water Trail

The 367-mile trail runs from Lewis and Clark’s “Canoe Camp” on the Clearwater River in Idaho down the Snake and Columbia Rivers to Bonneville Dam.  Explore >


Lower Columbia Water Trail

The Lower Columbia River Water Trail is a 146-mile trail in Washington and Oregon spanning the tidally influenced river waters from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean.  Explore >