Project Partners

This Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Geotourism Project is made possible with the support of the following partners.

 

 

National Park Service

The National Park Service cares for America’s more than 400 national parks…and works in almost every one of her 3,141 counties. National Park Service professionals take our mission on the road offering advice, technical assistance, recognition, and even cold, hard cash to help communities across the country preserve their own history and create close-to-home recreation opportunities.

www.nps.gov


 

Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation

The Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation (LCTHF), Inc. was created to stimulate public appreciation of the Lewis and Clark Expedition’s contributions to America’s heritage and to support education, research, development, and preservation of the Lewis and Clark experience. For 50 years, the LCTHF has served as advocate, interpreter, and protector of the trail through its program of grants for trail stewardship and education. The LCTHF and its chapters across the country have promoted Lewis and Clark scholarship, developed educational programs, worked to steward the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, and encouraged the telling of all the stories of the Expedition including those of the the tribes they met.

www.lewisandclark.org


 

Lewis and Clark Trust

The Lewis and Clark Trust, Inc. is a friends group of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Our goal is to preserve the story and Trail of the Corps of Discovery and to support the opportunities it provides for economic growth, education, and recreation as well as an understanding of our history as a multicultural people. We recognize the Trail is truly a natural trail that stretches from coast to coast.

www.lewisandclarktrust.org


 

AIANTA

For more than two decades, the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) has served as the national center for promoting authentic, sustainable tourism to American Indian nations. More information on destinations and experiences throughout Indian Country can be found at
NativeAmerica.travel. Additionally, the association serves as a resource for Native American communities and enterprises, providing technical assistance, training and capacity building through a diverse spectrum of programming.

www.aianta.org


 

Cannon Beach, Oregon

Cannon Beach welcomes you. Walk our sandy beach crowned by Haystack Rock an Oregon icon, and you will begin to see why we love this stretch of the Oregon Coast. Named one of the world’s 100 most beautiful places by National Geographic, this remarkable landscape will simply take your breath away. The stunning coastline views and remarkable natural areas blend magically with our charming village by the sea where you can savor the culinary bounty of the Pacific Northwest, enjoy luxurious oceanfront lodging and explore one of the top art towns in America. It’s just 90 minutes from Portland, but light years from ordinary. There is magic here.

https://www.cannonbeach.org/


 

City of Washougal, Washington

Welcome to Washougal, incorporated in 1908, it was the site of some of the very earliest American settlers and pioneers in the Washington Territory. Beautifully bordered by the Columbia and Washougal Rivers, the Washougal area is filled with many family friendly parks, hiking trails, businesses and neighborhoods. It is easy to see why visitors Keep Discovering Washougal!

http://visitwashougal.com/


 

City of Yankton, South Dakota

Yankton may be South Dakota’s most historic town as “Mother City of the Dakotas,” but the river is timeless. Life in Yankton has always revolved around the Missouri River. Native Americans followed the river’s flow to their destinations centuries ago. They named the land E-Hank-Ton-Wan, which means “people of the end village.” Now, the river provides recreation to hundreds of thousands of people who walk its shores every year. Visit and see what the Missouri River means to you.

http://www.cityofyankton.org/


 

Friends of Pompeys Pillar

We are a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization established in 1989 to support Pompeys Pillar National Monument, which contains the last remaining inscription of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806. Our mission is to preserve and protect the Monument by educating visitors through interpretation, special projects, and by supporting the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in its management of the site. The effort of the Pompeys Pillar Historical Association was a driving force to get this site into the public lands domain, which resulted in the purchase of the historical land from the Foote family by the BLM in 1991. By working cooperatively with the BLM in the planning and administration of the site, the Pompeys Pillar Historical Association successfully accomplishes this mission.

http://www.pompeyspillar.org/


 

Friends of Sacajawea State Park

Friends of Sacajawea State Park is a non-profit group who are like-minded people that want to ensure the existence of Sacajawea park and Interpretive Center so that family’s may enjoy the history. Our Mission is to help, teach, promote and protect the park.

Friendsofsacajaweastatepark.org


 

Montana State Parks

Visit Montana’s 55 State Parks and enjoy camping, hiking, fishing, swimming, boating and more and discover some of the greatest natural and cultural treasures on earth. Our Mission is to preserve and protect our state’s heritage and the natural beauty of our public lands for the benefit of our families, communities, local economies and out-of-state visitors. Our objectives are to provide excellent land stewardship, public safety and service through recreation, innovation and education. Our goals are to provide an extraordinary experience for our visitors and to keep our state park system strong now and for generations to come.

http://stateparks.mt.gov/


 

Visit Southeast Montana

Out here, big sky meets big adventure. It’s the kind of place to slow down and fall in love with Montana. It’s the kind of place where cowboys still ride horses across the open plains. It’s the kind of place where traces of dinosaur fossils are just waiting to be discovered because history is ever-present. Out here, you will be welcomed with an abundance of western hospitality. Visit Southeast Montana and take a moment or two to view the horizon from all directions.

http://southeastmontana.com/